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It's a Miracle! Part 3

  • GM Gserper
  • | Jul 14, 2013
  • | 9008 views
  • | 18 comments

Stalemate is a vital part of many theoretical endgames. For example the whole defensive mechanism in such a basic position as king and pawn vs. king is based on a stalemate:

Image: Thoughts from the Line


Here is a bunch of important theoretical positions every chess player needs to know. In all of them a huge material advantage is not enough to win and only leads to a stalemate:

This kind of positions happen in real games more frequently than you might think.  Try to find the way White saved himself in the following position:

If we talk about a common endgame queen vs. a pawn that has reached the 7th rank, then evaluation of the position depends on the pawn's file.  If the pawn is located on the central or knight's vertical, then a win is trivial providing you know the correct method:

So, the method is simple: you force your opponent's king to step in front of the pawn and you gain a tempo to bring your king closer. Rinse and repeat! Unfortunaly, this method doesn't work with a rook or a bishop pawn:

Sometimes a move that leads to a stalemate in a theoretical position is quite obvious, like in the next game:


But in some cases finding the right move even in a well known theoretical position can be very complicated.  In the next game a very experienced grandmaster resigned in a theoretically drawn position. Try to find the tricky defense:


The moral of the story is simple: know your endgames!

To be continued...


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Comments


  • 15 months ago

    guitarzan

    Stalemate! After all, who wants to lose?!?

  • 15 months ago

    CompuStar

    theoretical position | 1/2-1/2
    8
    7
    6
    5
    4
    3
    2
    1
    a
    b
    c
    d
    e
    f
    g
    h
     
  • 15 months ago

    CompuStar

    Grigory Serper (2542) vs. Hikaru Nakamura (2620)
    Chessmaster US Championships 2005 / San Diego USA
    Round 6 | 30 Nov 2004
    ECO: D12 | 1/2-1/2
    8
    7
    6
    5
    4
    3
    2
    1
    a
    b
    c
    d
    e
    f
    g
    h
    White to move
    81... hxg3
    Very good puzzle
  • 15 months ago

    Marius_Daniel_

    interesting article Mr.Serper

  • 15 months ago

    prismwinter

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 15 months ago

    TBentley

    @ChessPlayer6033: The last capture was on move 63, so there were only 4 more moves until the 50 move rule. Since Van Wely knew he couldn't win, I guess he just decided to end it right away.

    In that position, 109. Re2 was also a draw, but earlier, 101. Rd2+ (with the same stalemate idea) was the only drawing move.

  • 15 months ago

    CP6033

    I am not so good with stalmate tactics. In magnus game why is that a draw black does not have to take the rook!

  • 15 months ago

    siddharth64

    Last one Ra8 then Rb8/f8/d8

  • 15 months ago

    chess_like_a_snake

    [COMMENT DELETED]
  • 15 months ago

    GM_rudy

    TQ SIR

  • 15 months ago

    falcogrine

    In the last puzzle, Kb5 looks like it should simplify to a R v. B endgame, is there no forced win there either?

    One of the few endgames I don't know :(

  • 15 months ago

    Kinn72

    One of the most diferent and interesting aticles in a while, Thanks.

  • 15 months ago

    illusion1995

    the last one is quite impressive, if i was white i would almost cry from not beeing able to win,maybe its just better to let the pawn fall and try to succeed in rook vs bishop ending.

  • 15 months ago

    stuartspencer

    Rarely do I see stalemate tactics, quite an interesting read.

  • 15 months ago

    MrMars

    love it!

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